Planets In Order From The Sun- Ultimate Planet Guide

Planets In Order From The Sun- Ultimate Planet Guide

The whole solar practice consists of the Sun and the bodies that orbit it, which are orbited by smaller objects. Some of these bodies are dwarf planets or moons. The asteroids are from the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. Here are the planets in order from the sun.

What is the Description of a Planet?

The word planet originates from ancient Greek and means “wanderer.” In the average ages, people believed that the Earth wasn’t moving at all. The stars and the planets moved in the sky. That’s why they called them planets. Planets are celestial bodies that revolve around stars or other planets. And they don’t have to be big. A dwarf planet, like Pluto or Eris, is a planet just like Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn.

Planet Order from the Sun

Terrestrial Planets

The terrestrial asteroids are the four personal planets in the Solar System. Composed of rock and metal and known as the rocky planets. They are mercury, venus, earth, and mars in that order.

Mercury

Mercury

Mercury is an interesting planet and is the closest asteroid to the Sun, which means it is also the planet that orbits the Sun the fastest. As the closest asteroid to the Sun, Mercury is also the hottest planet. Mercury is smaller than all of the other planets in our Solar System, and it is the only one that does not have a moon orbiting it. The average distance between Mercury and the Sun is 58.6 million km (36 million mi), about one-third the distance from the Earth to the Sun. Mercury is a very small asteroid with a diameter of 4879 km. 

Venus

venus

Venus is the next planet of the Sun. It has the greatest revolution period of any planet in our Solar System. It rotates backward relative to the other planets, probably because of a collision with another planet in its early history. The thick atmosphere is primarily composed of carbon dioxide, the pressure at the planet’s surface is 92 times that of Earth, and it has the most severe greenhouse effect of any known planet.

Venus orbits the Sun at an average length of about 108 million km and completes an orbit every 224.7 days. However, it has no surface water, and its atmosphere is 96.5% carbon dioxide, with just traces of nitrogen and other gases.

Earth

Earth

As the third planet from the Sun, Earth is the largest planet in our solar system and the fifth largest in the entire universe. It has an average distance from the Sun of 149.6 million miles, and its diameter is 7,926 miles (equatorial). Earth is the only asteroid in the creation known to have life. It is the only planet in our solar system with an oxygen-rich atmosphere, and it is the largest of the terrestrial planets, meaning it is composed of rock and metals and has a solid surface. It is located in the inner solar system, making it the closest planet to the Sun. 

Mars

Mars

Mars is the fourth planet of the Sun. It is a terrestrial planet and is the second smallest planet in the solar system after Mercury. Mars’s thin atmosphere is only about 1% as dense as Earth’s. It contains carbon dioxide, nitrogen, argon, and traces of oxygen. Mars is well-known for its canals and dust storms. The distance connecting the Sun and Mars is 6,792,581,000 kilometers.

Giant Planets

The planets in our solar system range in size from small, rocky Mercury to the gas giant Saturn. The largest planet is Jupiter, and Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune follow it. So, just how big are they? Mercury is the smallest planet, with broadness of about 4,790 miles (7,730 km). That’s only slightly wider than Earth’s diameter of 7,926 miles (12,756 km).

Jupiter

Jupiter

Jupiter is the fifth asteroid from the Sun and the most massive planet in the Solar System. It is organized as a gas giant along with Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Jupiter has a broadness of 142,984 km, making it approximately 11 times the diameter of Earth and 2.5 times the diameter of Uranus. It is assigned as a gas giant along with Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Jupiter is made of around 90% hydrogen, with most of the remaining material being helium and other trace elements.

Saturn

Saturn

Saturn is the sixth asteroid from the Sun and the second-largest in the Solar System, following Jupiter. It is a gas monster with a common space about nine times that of Earth. Although only one-eighth the average thickness of Earth, Saturn’s larger volume is just over 95 times more massive.

If the Earth is compared to the size of a beach ball, Saturn would be about basketball. It rotates very slowly on its axis—once every 10 hours and 23 minutes.

Uranus

Uranus

The seventh planet from the Sun is Uranus, a cold, icy gas giant 2.8 billion miles away from the Sun. The planet is 14 times wider than Earth and has a diameter of about 31,000 miles. Uranus is in the Sun’s outer solar system and orbits the Sun once every 84 years. It is a vapor giant with no surface features and more than 50 moons. Around the planet, there is a thick layer of hydrogen, helium, water, ammonia, methane, and other gases. Scientists believe that the planet’s atmosphere is mostly hydrogen and helium, with some methane, water, and ammonia.

Neptune

Neptune

The blue-green planet Neptune is the farthest planet from the Sun in our Solar System. It orbits the Sun once every 164.8 years at an average distance of about 30.1 AU and has a mass of about 1.0243×10^26 kg. Its diameter is 30,775 km, making Neptune slightly larger than Uranus. Neptune’s atmosphere is primarily composed of hydrogen, helium, and methane.

Dwarf Planets in Order from the Sun

The dwarf planet Pluto (for as long as it still is considered a planet) is the most well-known of all the dwarf planets. However, it is not the biggest, nor is it the closest to the Sun. Other dwarf planets include Ceres, Eris, Haumea, Makemake, and Sedna.

The dwarf planet Ceres is the largest of the five dwarf planets, with 946 miles. It is the only dwarf planet classified as a “dwarf planet” by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) and the only dwarf planet in the inner solar system.

Ceres

Ceres

The dwarf planet Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Made of rock and ice and is often classified as a terrestrial planet, but some astronomers consider it to be a dwarf planet based on its size. With a diameter of 950 miles, Ceres is roughly the size of Texas. Ceres’s Surface is cratered and is partly covered with frozen water and ice.

Pluto

Pluto

Pluto is the ninth asteroid in our solar scheme and is the second smallest planet in our solar system, after Mercury. It orbits the Sun every 248 years. It is smaller than every other planet in our solar system, except for Mercury. Pluto is the farthest planet in our solar system. It is about 40 times smaller than Earth.

Haumea

Haumea

Haumea a Dwarf planet that used to be called a “plutoid”. The third-largest object found in the Kuiper belt, after Pluto and Eris. Haumea’s highly elliptical orbit around the Sun can take nearly 43 astronomical units away (1 A.U. is the distance between the Earth and the Sun). It takes 284 Earth years to complete one orbit. Haumea’s orbit has a perihelion of 35 A.U., which is very far away from the Sun, and it has an aphelion of 48 A.U., which is even farther away. Haumea also has a highly inclined orbit of 43 degrees, making it a “dwarf planet.

Makemake

Makemake

Makemake is a dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt, a region of icy bodies and minor planets beyond Neptune. It is similar to Pluto in size and density and is one of five dwarf planets recognized in the Solar System and Ceres, Eris, Haumea, and Pluto. Makemake has one known moon, Weywot, which is about one-fourth the size of Makemake.

Eris

Eris

The only dwarf planet found in the outer Solar System is Eris. It has the second-largest diameter and the fifth-largest mass of any known body in the Solar System. It is more massive than the largest known dwarf planet, Pluto, which was discovered in 1930.

Eris is the fifth planet in our solar system and the first planet in the dwarf planet category. Discovered in 2005 by Michael E. Brown, Chad Trujillo, and David L. Rabinowitz. Eris is notable for its highly eccentric orbit, which takes it farther from the Sun than Pluto and brings it closer to the Sun than Neptune. This unique orbit makes Eris one of the most distant objects in our solar system and the most massive.

Conclusion

Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars are the closest planets to the Sun. Known as the inner asteroids. Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are the numerous distant four major planets from the Sun. Called the outer planets. The planets closest to the Sun have thin, dusty atmospheres. The planets farther from the Sun are larger and have thick, swirling atmospheres.

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